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Sewing seam pockets into trousers #TV04

I explain step by step how I sew a seam pocket into a pair of trousers in the following video and illustrated text instructions. Seam pockets are virtually invisible from the outside and therefore do not detract from other design elements, such as the front pocket. Waistband and creases, from.

I’m going to skip the instructions for closing the leg seams and sewing the different hem variations here, as the side seam needs to be closed to finish the seam pocket.

Video instruction:

1. This is required:

The picture shows the parts required for sewing the seam pocket.
This is required.

Pattern pieces made from shell fabric:

  • Front pieces (VH)- 1 pair
  • Back pieces (HH) – 1 pair
  • Pocket bag (TBU VH) – 1 pair

Pattern pieces made from lining fabric:

  • Pocket bags (TBO VH) – 1 pair

Paper pattern pieces:

  • Pocket bag template (P-TBV)

Tools and aids:

  • Edge tape for the pocket opening if the trousers are sewn without lining (e.g. B. T20 from Vlieseline)
  • Pins or clips
  • Hand shears
  • Chalk or marker pen

2. Reinforce the opening of the seam pocket

If you are working your trousers with lining fabric, you have already reinforced the opening of the seam pocket and can continue right here.

The picture shows how the pocket opening is marked.
The procedure is marked.

I now reinforce the pocket opening on the front of trousers without lining fabric. To do this, I first transfer the markings for the pocket opening from the pattern to the wrong side of the front trousers.

The picture shows how the pocket opening is reinforced.
The pocket opening is reinforced.

I apply the edging tape directly to the outer edge. It extends approx. 1 cm beyond the markings for the pocket opening. Then I iron on the tape.

3. Close the side seam

If you are sewing your pants without a knee lining, the trouser parts have not yet been serged. For further processing, you must therefore first finish the outer leg seams of all four parts (2 x front trousers and 2 x back trousers) with the overlock or a zigzag stitch.

The picture shows the front and back trousers pinned together at the side seam.
The side seam is pinned.

First I close the side seam. To do this, I lay the front and back trousers right sides together and pin them.

The picture shows the marking for the pocket opening.
Markings for the pocket opening.

I check whether the markings for the pocket opening are still recognizable. If not, I transfer them to the front pants again.

As I’m sewing pants with a lining here, you can’t see the edge tape – I ironed it on before I added the lining.

The picture shows how the side seam is sewn.
The front trousers are on top.

The front trousers are facing upwards when sewing. First, I sew the seam between the upper edge and the upper marking for the pocket opening. Note the width of the seam allowance that results from your pattern.

The picture shows how the seam is locked.
The seam is locked.

I lock the seam at the marking.

The picture shows how the lower part of the side seam is sewn.
The seam begins at the lower marking.

Then I reattached at the lower end of the pocket opening. The thread that you can see at the back of the picture is hanging loose – don’t let this confuse you.

The picture shows how the side seam is sewn.
The beginning of the seam is locked.

I lock the beginning of the seam and close the side seam up to the hem.

For the second trouser leg, I work in reverse so that I can also sew on the front trousers. So I start at the hem and end at the top of the pants.

The picture shows how the pocket opening is stapled.
The pocket opening is stapled.

I topstitch the pocket opening with a large stitch along the seam. The start and end of the seam are not interlocked. For further processing, it is helpful if this basting stitch contrasts well with the color of the fabric.

The picture shows how the seam allowances are ironed apart.
Press the seam allowance open.

Then I press the seam allowances of the side seam open.

Here, too, I use the back of my clothes brush so that the wood can absorb the moisture. The more carefully you work here, the flatter the seam will be.

The picture shows how the side seam is ironed apart in the upper area.
Press out the side seam.

I place the upper part of the trousers on an ironing pad or the curve of the ironing board to iron out the seam.

4. Serging the pocket bags

The picture shows the finished pocket bags
The outer edges are finished.

I finish the outer edges of all four pocket bags with the overlocker. Alternatively, you can also use a zigzag stitch on your sewing machine.

5. Sew on the upper pocket bag of the seam pocket

The picture shows how the distance to the side seam is measured.
The distance to the side seam is measured.

Now I sew the upper pocket bag made of lining fabric to the seam allowance of the front trousers. The seam at the base of the pocket bag should be approx. 5 mm from the side seam.

The top edge of the pocket bag may protrude by approx. 1 cm. I will cut back the excess later.

The picture shows how the upper pocket bag is pinned in place.
The upper pocket bag is pinned in place.

As my side seam has a seam allowance of 20 mm, I pin the pocket bag to the front trousers with a 5 mm gap to the outer edge. This allows me to sew with a 1 cm gap to the edge of the pocket bag and the seam then has the desired 5 mm gap to the side seam.

The picture shows how the start of the seam is marked.
The start of the seam is marked.

I mark the beginning of the seam, which is approx. 1.5 cm from the bottom of the pocket bag.

The picture shows how the upper pocket bag is sewn on.
The upper pocket bag is sewn on.

Then I sew on the upper pocket bag as described above, leaving a 1 cm gap to the edge of the pocket bag.

The picture shows how the upper pocket bag is stitched down.
The pocket bag is topstitched in place.

I then fold the pocket bag to the side and topstitch it close to the seam allowance. Here I also note the distance of approx. 1.5 cm to the lower edge.

The picture shows how the lower pocket bag is ironed.
The seam is ironed.

Before continuing with the lower pocket bag, I press over the seam on the upper pocket bag again.

6. Sew on the lower pocket bag of the seam pocket

The picture shows how the lower pocket bag is created.
The bag underneath is put on.

I place the lower pocket bag so that it is flush with the side edge of the back trousers. I place it flush on the top edge of the upper pocket bag.

The picture shows the upper and lower pocket bags.
Outer edge of the pocket bags.

If the pocket bags don’t fit together exactly at the raw edge, it doesn’t matter – I’ll cut it to size later.

The picture shows where the lower pocket bag is sewn.
The pocket bag is sewn inside the marking.

In this position, I pin the lower pocket bag to the seam allowance of the back trousers and topstitch it exactly within the markings for the pocket opening using a normal stitch length.

The picture shows how the lower pocket bag is sewn on.
It is sewn very close to the auxiliary seam.

Stitch very close to the auxiliary seam, taking care not to overstitch it. The start and end of the seam are interlocked.

The picture shows the finished seam
The finished seam.

Here you can see the straight seam from the side that was at the bottom when sewing.

7. Connect pocket bags

The picture shows how the pocket bag of the seam pocket is marked.
The pocket bag is marked.

I place the template for the pocket bag exactly within the markings on the top pocket bag.

Then I transfer the outline of the pocket bag onto the lining fabric using tailor’s chalk or a marker pen.

The picture shows how the pocket bags of the seam pockets are pinned.
The pocket bags are tucked in.

I pin the outer edges of the two pocket bags together. If they are not exactly on top of each other, this is not a problem. Under no circumstances should you distort the pocket bags just so that the outer edges are flush.

The picture shows how the pocket bag is sewn.
The pocket bag is closed.

I stitch the pocket bags together along the marking. I start and end exactly at the side seam.

Make sure that the seam allowances of the side seam are still apart. The side seam allowances of the back trousers and lower pocket bag are not sewn together when sewing the pocket bag.

8. Finish the seam pocket

The picture shows how the auxiliary thread is removed.
The auxiliary thread is removed.

Before further processing, I remove the auxiliary thread at the pocket opening.

The picture shows a view into the seam pocket.
View into the seam pocket.

This is what the finished pocket opening looks like.

The picture shows the seam pocket before serging
The seam pocket is serged.

The pocket bag of the seam pocket must now be finished.

If your pocket bags are not exactly flush, you can trim them at the same time as overlocking. I cut back the protruding seam allowance of the lower pocket bag with scissors beforehand so that I can also grab the lining fabric when overlocking.

The picture shows the overlocked seam pocket.
The lower pocket bag is topstitched to the seam allowance.

I now sew the seam allowance of the lower pocket bag onto the seam allowance of the back trousers, close to the edge.

The picture shows how the thread caterpillar is cut back.
The thread caterpillar is shortened.

Before I do this, I cut off about 2 cm of the thread bead that was created when serging with the overlocker.

The picture shows how the thread bead is placed between the seam allowances.
The thread caterpillar is hidden.

Then I place them between the two seam allowances and pin them together.

The picture shows how the lower pocket bag is attached.
The seam allowances are sewn together.

I sew the two seam allowances of the back trousers and lower pocket bag together with a gap of approx. 4 mm to the outer edge.

The picture shows how the seam pocket is secured at the top edge.
The pocket bag is secured inside the seam allowance.

I sew the pocket bag to the upper edge of the trousers within the seam allowance on the front trousers so that it does not slip during further processing. Make sure that everything lies smoothly on top of each other and that the bag is not distorted.

The picture shows how the seam pocket is cut back at the top.
Cut off the excess fabric.

Now I can cut back the excess fabric at the top edge flush with the front piece.

The picture shows how the seam pocket is ironed.
The pocket opening is ironed.

I iron over the pocket opening again so that everything lies flat and then sew the seam pocket of the second trouser leg in the same way.

The picture shows the finished trouser parts.
The finished seam pockets.

And this is what your two trouser legs look like with the finished seam pockets.

Here you will find the links to the next step:

If you’re not quite ready yet and perhaps want to start at the beginning, you’ll find some links here: